Dr Paul Conroy B.A., M.Phil., P.G. Dip., M.Sc., PhD.

Clinical Lecturer in Speech and Language Therapy

Role

Clinical Lecturer with specific responsibility for adult acquired neurological disabilities modules within the BSc Speech and Language Therapy

Externally:

Chair of British Aphasiology Society

Member of Clinical Studies Group (Rehabilitation), Stroke Research Network

External Examiner: MRes Applied Research in Human Communication Disorders UCL

Memberships of Committees and Professional Bodies

HCPC

RCSLT

Research

My research interests relate to aphasia and acquired communication deficits more broadly. Within aphasia, I am specifically interested in naming therapies, verb processing, writing therapies, sentence and discourse therapies. I am interested in the relationship between impairment therapies and functionally significant outcomes, particularly with regard to discourse and conversational data. I was funded by a Stroke Association Allied Health Professional Therapy Research Bursary to complete a PhD on the topic of 'Errorless learning as a treatment applied to verb and sentence impairments in aphasia'. The project was supervised by Professor Matt Lambon Ralph, and Dr Karen Sage, from NARU. Previously, I completed an MSc in Human Communication in 2003 at City University London which was funded by the HSA and the Speech and Language Therapy Department at Kings College Hospital, London; the dissertation for this degree was on the topic of discourse analysis of aphasic narratives.

Teaching

Module Co-ordinator: Acquired Speech and Swallowing Disorders (year 2, BSc Speech and Language Therapy)

Module Co-ordinator: Acquired Language and Communication Disorders (year 3, BSc Speech and Language Therapy)

Advanced Study Options I & II (year 4, BSc Speech and Language Therapy)

Clinical & Behavioural Neuroscience module, MSc in Cognitive Brain Imaging

Biography

I am from Dublin, where I studied Linguistics and Philosophy at University College Dublin, and Linguistics at Trinity College Dublin.  I qualified as a Speech and Language Therapist (SLT) at City University London in 1993 and had clinical jobs in Liverpool, London and Shropshire.  I specialised in adult acquired neurological disorders (aphasia, dysphagia, dysarthria) as Specialist SLT in Neurosciences at King's College Hospital, where I also spent a brief stint as the Co-ordinator of the King's MND Care and Research Centre.  My last clinical post was as lead SLT with the Shropshire Enablement Team (multi-disciplinary community neuro-rehabilitaiton team) after which I undertook a PhD at the University of Manchester.  I became a full time Clinical Lecturer in November 2008.

Publications

2014

  • Thiel, L. & Conroy, P. (2014). A comparison of errorless and errorful therapies for dysgraphia after stroke. Neuropsychol Rehabil, February(online version), eScholarID:219676

2013

  • Carragher, M., Sage, K. & Conroy, P. (2013). Interactive Storytelling Therapy: Task Effects and Generalisation to Conversation. 94(16), 269-270. eScholarID:218802
  • Conroy, P., Carragher, M. & Sage, K. (2013). Evaluation of a multi-component therapy targeting sentence production in stroke survivors with Broca’s-type aphasia: evidence from linguistic assessment tasks and everyday conversations. 8(3), 30-30. eScholarID:218801
  • Marcella Carragher, Karen Sage, Paul Conroy. (2013). The effects of verb retrieval therapy for people with non-fluent aphasia: Evidence from assessment tasks and conversation. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, eScholarID:208132

2012

  • Paul Conroy, Matthew Lambon Ralph. (2012). Errorless Learning and Rehabilitation of Language and Memory Impairments. Psychology Press. eScholarID:171003
  • Carragher, M., Conroy, P., Sage, K. & Wilkinson, R. (2012). Can therapy change the everyday conversations of people with aphasia? A review of the literature and future directions. Aphasiology, 27(7), 895-916. eScholarID:171004 | DOI:10.1080/02687038.2012.676164
  • Carragher, M., Wilkinson, R., Sage, K. & Conroy, P. (2012). The effects of lexical retrieval therapy on the conversations of people with chronic non-fluent aphasia: Can we capture and quantify change? 60, 150-151. eScholarID:218798
  • Conroy P., Snell C., Sage K. & Lambon Ralph, M. (2012). Using Phonemic Cueing of Spontaneous Naming to Predict Item Responsiveness to Therapy for Anomia in Aphasia. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 93(1 Supplement), S53-S60. eScholarID:144891 | DOI:10.1016/j.apmr.2011.07.205
  • Conroy, P. & Lambon Ralph, M. (2012). Overview of Special Issue on Errorless Learning & Rehabilitation of language and memory impairments in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation and ways forward for future research. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 22(2), 319-328. eScholarID:171034 | DOI:10.1080/09602011.2012.662075
  • Conroy, P., Scowcroft, J. (2012). Decreasing cues for a dynamic list of noun and verb naming targets: a case-series aphasia therapy study. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 22(2), 295-318. eScholarID:171005 | DOI:10.1080/09602011.2011.641434
  • Lambon Ralph, M.A. & Conroy, P. (2012). Case series, neuroscience-infused, computational neuropsychology will play a crucial role in the future of aphasiology. Commentary on Laine and Martin, “Cognitive neuropsychology has been, is, and will be significant to aphasiology”. 26(11), 1381-1386. eScholarID:218799

2009

  • Conroy P, Sage KE, Lambon Ralph MA. (2009). A comparison of word versus sentence cues as therapy for verb naming in aphasia. Aphasiology, 23(4), 462-482. eScholarID:1d18086 | DOI:10.1080/02687030802514920
  • Conroy P, Sage KE, Lambon Ralph MA. (2009). Errorless and errorful therapy for verb and noun naming in aphasia. Aphasiology, 23(11), 1311-1337. eScholarID:1d18088 | DOI:10.1080/02687030902756439
  • Conroy P, Sage KE, Lambon Ralph MA. (2009). Improved vocabulary production after naming therapy in aphasia: can gains in picutre naming generalise to connected speech? International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, 17, 1-27. eScholarID:1d18084 | DOI:10.1080/13682820802585975
  • Conroy P, Sage KE, Lambon Ralph MA. (2009). The effects of decreasing and increasing cue therapy on improving naming speed and accuracy for verbs and nouns in aphasia. Aphasiology, 23(6), 707-730. eScholarID:1d18082 | DOI:10.1080/02687030802165574